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 Post subject: So, what is going to happen to Taveruun?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:48 am 
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Hi,

In a nutshell, Taveruun is going to become mid-14th century France with a few fantasy elements thrown in and some technological anachronisms.

This means straying from the material written in Core to some extent. Not that there is much written in Core, but when drilling down into loads of detail sometimes the material in Core just looks really superficial and tacky. So some things get stripped away, heaps gets added, and lots of real world material gets ported in and modified to suit the world of Weyrth.

What might those changes entail?

The Imperial Church will look almost exactly the same as the medieval catholic Christian church in terms of structure, capability, and purpose.

The feudal landscape will mirror the French feudal system.

Names of peoples, places, events, and so on will have a local equivalent that is French. So, for example, while the Imperials refer to the capital of Taveruun as Longstone the locals refer to it as Rochegrande.

Day-to-day life in Rochegrande will mirror that of medieval life in Lyon.

Rochegrande is on a river (whoever heard of a medieval capital not being on a river?).

There will be many other changes. It is my intention to ensure that something new appears in this forum every weekend. It might be something as simple as a picture or as detailed as a chapter.

Regards,

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 Post subject: Re: So, what is going to happen to Taveruun?
PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 12:41 am 
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I don’t know if this really fits in here, but I don’t want to open a new thread in your very own developer’s forum. And as this concerns Taveruun more than any other staked country, it just belongs in here, so I will go ahead.

My thoughts do recently stray evermore to both Tez’Hamun and the East of Weyrth and from this and the short description of Fauth in the Core Book I developed what seems to me a very plausible theory of trade contact between East and West. This theory draws upon real-world parallels, facts we have already established for the Saphire Bay and Taveruun and the nature of its inclusion in the Xanarian Empire, but it also establishes new facts. So please tell me what you think of this:

When maritime trade between East and West started to haltingly commence, it was conducted entirely by ships from the East unloading their goods at the harbours of Tez’Hamun. At this time, in around 450 Weyr, Tez’Hamun had already fought and lost its first wars with the young Xanarian Empire to the north, which was as yet oblivious of the East and its treasures. As a consequence of these drawn-out hostilities, Tez’Hamun had closed all of his harbours to Imperial ships, and it did now also prevent the shipsfrom the East to travel along its coasts further into the West. This situation di persist for quite some time, and what little of the Eastern goods trickled north to the Sea of Fallen Gods by various channels was initially thought to have its source in Tez’Hamun itself.
Soon after 550 Weyr, the technical and societal development of the proto-Taveruunians had brought them to the attention of Eastern mariners, who did from this time onward increasingly travel up the Saphire Bay. Tez’Hamun tried to prevent this, but by this time its once powerful navy was less than a shadow of its former glory. Tez’Hamun, which is in itself lacking any wood suitable for shipbuilding, had not only lost all of it foreign possessions, mostly to Xanarium, but it had also become largely isolated from its neighbours. This in turn led to an acute shortage of building wood which soon resulted in an immense downsizing deterioration of its navy. This, ogether with the complete lack of suitable harbours or even anchoring places along its eastern coast, prevented Tez’Hamun from completely blocking the Saphire Straits.
The Xanarian Empire now soon became aware of the blooming trade in the Saphire Bay, right beyond its doorstep, and extended its control to include the bay’s northern shores. By 615 Weyr, it had become the dominant power in the Saphire Bay, and Tez’Hamun desisted at the threat of a Xanarian punitive expedition from interfering with maritime trade in the region. The following centuries saw an increase in the rade between East and West via the Saphire Bay, a trade which now did pass Tez’Hamun completely by. New and improved methods of shipbuilding and navigation did further this boom, until the amount if trade did once again decrease due to political and economical changes in East in West, most dramatic among them maybe the fall of the Xanarian Empire and the subsequent sharp decrease of wealth in the West.
After the fall of the Empire, Taveruun did inherit the conducting of trade with the East, although of a much reduced volume, from its former master. At first, this commerce had dried up almost completely, but it picked up again by the middle of the 14th century, after the upheaval of the disintegration of the Empire had subsided. This trend has continued slowly but steadily ever since, even though trade volumes are still a far call from what they once used to be.
In the present century, Fauth has entered the secene as a new player in the trade between East and West, and it went on to become the major one. This is the result of a kind of unholy alliance with Tez’Hamun. A nation run by pragmatic merchants, Fauth tried to already in the late 14th century to better its relations with isolated Tez’Hamun and have its ports opened to their ships. Tez’Hamun, with its not entirely undeserved reputation as an “Empire of Evil” going back to its defeat by the Xanarian Empire, which went on to shape opinions in the West for centuries to come, did haltingly enter upon this courtship by Fauth. By 1400 Weyr, ships from Fauth did unload at Tez’Hamunian ports, and a few short years later they did already use them as much-needed stop-overs for the journey farther east. Soon, Fauth had Tez’Hamun again interested in the trade with the East, which had so long passed it by. In exchange for trading privileges, Fauth did not only supply building wood, but also the know-how to construct more (though not completely) modern vessels – without access to wood, this art had not seen any improvement in Tez’Hamun for almost a millennium. In accordance with the treaty with Fauth, Tez’Hamun did then use its new navy to block the Saphire Straits for all traffic.
The width of the straits and the lack of nearby suitable operation bases did preclude the navy of Tez’Hamun from completely halting the traffic, but they were still able to turn back (in the case of eastern ships) or confiscate (in the case of Taveruunian vessels) about every other ship.
At first, Taveruun did attempt to destroy the navy of Tez’Hamun or at least drive it out of the Strait. Wisely lacking confidence in its nautical skills, the navy did deny battle and simply retreated, and now, the very lack of sutiable harbours in and around the straits served to Tez’Hamun’s advantage: Without bases, the navy of Taveruun couldn’t secure the straits indefinitly but had to withdraw; whenever they did, the Tez’Hamunian navy returned.
Thus the ploy of Fauth and Tez’Hamun did succeed. The Taveruunian navy could and did protect outbound Taveruunian ships, but when the ships returned, the navy wasn’t there and they fell prey to the Tez’Hamunians. Eastern ships did lack even this degree of protection and had soon given up traversing the Saphire Straits; instead they do now noless happily unload at Tez’Hamunian ports. Taveruunian merchants took to sail in convoys under the protection of armed ships, but as these ships were needed on both runs through the straits, they effectively had to accompany the merchantmen for the entire trade journey. This is so expensive, that the Taveruunian merchants are hardly able to offer Eastern goods at competitive prices. As a result, many a merchant had to give up and seek other business ventures, and the few remaining ones will soon have to follow suit. Fauth and its partner Tez’Hamun seem to have succeeded at driving Taveruun out of the business and largely monopolize maritime trade with the East.

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 Post subject: Re: So, what is going to happen to Taveruun?
PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 9:24 pm 
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Grettir wrote:
I don’t know if this really fits in here, but I don’t want to open a new thread in your very own developer’s forum. And as this concerns Taveruun more than any other staked country, it just belongs in here, so I will go ahead.
...

Thus the ploy of Fauth and Tez’Hamun did succeed. The Taveruunian navy could and did protect outbound Taveruunian ships, but when the ships returned, the navy wasn’t there and they fell prey to the Tez’Hamunians. Eastern ships did lack even this degree of protection and had soon given up traversing the Saphire Straits; instead they do now noless happily unload at Tez’Hamunian ports. Taveruunian merchants took to sail in convoys under the protection of armed ships, but as these ships were needed on both runs through the straits, they effectively had to accompany the merchantmen for the entire trade journey. This is so expensive, that the Taveruunian merchants are hardly able to offer Eastern goods at competitive prices. As a result, many a merchant had to give up and seek other business ventures, and the few remaining ones will soon have to follow suit. Fauth and its partner Tez’Hamun seem to have succeeded at driving Taveruun out of the business and largely monopolize maritime trade with the East.


This is all fine by me Grettir. I don't see Taveruun as a significant power. Expansionist views require unity and they aren't heading down that path. So I like the idea that the trade route(s) have been picked off.

Regards,

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Ian Plumb
Illustrations for Gamers
Lyonpaedia
Griffin Grove Gaming
Kraftworks for Kids School Holiday Program


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